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Google Images. The maximum complete image search on the web.Four species of monkey are local to the forests of Costa Rica, the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii), the Panamanian white-faced capuchin (Cebus imitator), the mantled howler (Alouatta palliata) and Geoffroy's spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi). All four species are categorized scientifically as New World Monkeys. Two of the species, the Central American squirrel monkey andDownload 4 (*4*) stock footage. Affordable and search from tens of millions of royalty free images, pictures and vectors.

List of Costa Rican monkey species - Wikipedia

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List of Costa Rican monkey species - Wikipedia

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List of Costa Rican monkey species

Jump to navigation Jump to go looking Central American squirrel monkey, Saimiri oerstedii, smallest of the Costa Rican monkey species Panamanian white-faced capuchin (Cebus imitator)

Four species of monkey are local to the forests of Costa Rica, the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii), the Panamanian white-faced capuchin (Cebus imitator), the mantled howler (Alouatta palliata) and Geoffroy's spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi).[1][2] All 4 species are categorized scientifically as New World Monkeys.[3] Two of the species, the Central American squirrel monkey and the white-faced capuchin, belong to the family Cebidae, the family containing the squirrel monkeys and capuchins. The other two species belong to the family Atelidae, the family containing the howler monkeys, spider monkeys, woolly monkeys and muriquis.[4][5] Each of the four species may also be noticed in national parks inside Costa Rica, where viewing them in herbal atmosphere is a well-liked tourist appeal.[6][7] The handiest park in which all 4 species may also be observed is Corcovado National Park, on the Osa Peninsula.[8]

The smallest of the Costa Rican monkey species is the Central American squirrel monkey. Adult men moderate 0.8 kg (1.8 lb) and grownup women folk moderate 0.7 kg (1.5 lb).[9] The Central American squirrel monkey has probably the most limited range of any Costa Rican monkey, residing simplest in secondary forests and in part logged primary forests at the central and south Pacific coast of Costa Rica, and on the Pacific coast of Panama near the Costa Rican border.[1][10] In 2008, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) revised its conservation status to "vulnerable" after ranking it "endangered" since 1982.[11] The Central American squirrel monkey is maximum incessantly seen in Manuel Antonio National Park and Corcovado National Park in Costa Rica.[12]

The different three species have wider levels within Costa Rica, each being present in forests over much of the country.[13] The white-faced capuchin, which has a variety from Honduras to Ecuador,[14] is the second one smallest Costa Rican monkey. Adult men average 3.7 kg (8.2 lb) and adult women folk reasonable 2.7 kg (6.0 lb).[9] The mantled howler, with a range from Mexico to Ecuador,[15] is the second greatest monkey species in Costa Rica. Adult men average 7.2 kg (16 lb) and adult ladies average 5.4 kg (12 lb).[16] Males make loud calls, particularly at crack of dawn and at nightfall, that can be heard for several kilometers.[1] Geoffroy's spider monkey, with a spread from Mexico to Panama,[17] is the largest of the Costa Rican monkeys, with men averaging 8.2 kg (18 lb) and ladies averaging 7.7 kg (17 lb).[16] It has long, slender arms and an extended, prehensile tail.[1][18] The IUCN has rated the white-faced capuchin and mantled howler within the lowest conservation chance class of "least concern", and has rated Geoffroy's spider monkey as "endangered".[14][15][17] Both the white-faced capuchin and the mantled howler are commonly seen in Costa Rica's parks.[13][19]

It is unknown why the Central American squirrel monkey has this type of restricted vary relative to the other Costa Rican monkey species. One theory is that the Central American squirrel monkey's ancestors arrived in Central America previous than the ancestors of the other species. Under this idea, the squirrel monkey's ancestors arrived in Central America between 3 and three.5 million years ago, but may just no longer compete effectively when the ancestors of the opposite species arrived in Central America about 2 million years ago. The different species thus drove the squirrel monkey out of most of its authentic vary. Another issue could also be the Central American squirrel monkey's choice for lowland, coastal spaces, which may make them extra liable to significant population declines due to occasional major hurricanes.[20]

Two other monkey species are on occasion reported as dwelling in Costa Rica, Geoffroy's tamarin (Saguinus geoffroyi) and the Panamanian night monkey (Aotus zonalis or Aotus lemurinus zonalis).[1][21][22] The western fringe of Geoffroy's tamarin's recognized range is solely west of the Panama Canal zone, about 2 hundred kilometres (120 mi) from the Costa Rica border, and thus reviews of it dwelling in Costa Rica are perhaps inaccurate.[1][21] Confusion can have resulted from the fact that over a part of its vary Geoffroy's tamarin is locally known as mono titi, which is a reputation extensively utilized for the Central American squirrel monkey in Costa Rica.[1] Reports of the Panamanian evening monkey living in Costa Rica are plausible, since the species is known to occur at the Caribbean coast of Panama not a long way from the Costa Rica border.[1][22] However, reports of it dwelling in Costa Rica have now not been confirmed by way of scientists.[1][22]

Key

Female mantled howler (Alouatta palliata) Common Name Common name of the species, in keeping with Wilson, et al. Mammal Species of the World (2005) Scientific Name Scientific identify of the species Family Family inside of New World monkeys to which the species belongs Average Size – Male Average size of adult male participants of the species, in kilograms and kilos, in line with Campbell, et al. Primates in Perspective (2007) Average Size – Female Average size of grownup feminine contributors of the species, in kilograms and pounds, in line with Campbell, et al. Primates in Perspective (2007) Conservation Status Conservation standing of the species, in keeping with IUCN as of 2008 Range Countries during which the species occurs;

Costa Rican monkey species

Geoffroy's spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) Common Name Scientific Name Family Average Size – Male Average Size – Female Conservation Status Range References Central American squirrel monkey Saimiri oerstedii Cebidae 0.829 kg (1.83 lb) 0.695 kg (1.53 lb) Vulnerable Costa Rica, Panama [9][11][23]Panamanian white-faced capuchin Cebus imitator Cebidae 3.668 kg (8.09 lb) 2.666 kg (5.88 lb) Least Concern Honduras via Ecuador [2][9][14][24]Mantled howler Alouatta palliata Atelidae 7.150 kg (15.76 lb) 5.350 kg (11.79 lb) Least Concern Mexico via Ecuador [15][16][25]Geoffroy's spider monkey Ateles geoffroyi Atelidae 8.210 kg (18.10 lb) 7.700 kg (16.98 lb) Endangered Mexico through Panama [16][17][26]

References

^ a b c d e f g h i .mw-parser-output cite.citationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .citation qquotes:"\"""\"""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .quotation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,clear),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")appropriate 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .quotation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(clear,transparent),url((*4*))appropriate 0.1em middle/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(clear,clear),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")right 0.1em center/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolour:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:assist.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(clear,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")correct 0.1em heart/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolor:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errorshow:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintshow:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritWainwright, M. (2002). The Natural History of Costa Rican Mammals. Zona Tropical. pp. 125–149. ISBN 0-9705678-1-2. ^ a b Mittermeier, Russell A. & Rylands, Anthony B. (2013). Mittermeier, Russell A.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Wilson, Don E. (eds.). Handbook of the Mammals of the World: Volume 3, Primates. Lynx. pp. 412–413. ISBN 978-8496553897.CS1 maint: more than one names: authors listing (hyperlink) ^ Hartwig, W. (2007). "Primate Evolution". In Campbell, C.; Fuentes, A.; MacKinnon, Okay.; Panger, M.; Bearder, S. (eds.). Primates in Perspective. The Oxford University Press. pp. 18–19. ISBN 978-0-19-517133-4. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 129–139. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (third ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 148–152. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. ^ Greenspan, E. (2006). Frommer's Costa Rica 2007. Wiley Publishing. p. 88. ISBN 0-471-94440-8. ^ Vorhees, M. & Firestone, M. (2006). Lonely Planet Costa Rica. Lonely Planet. p. 63. ISBN 1-74104-463-4. ^ Hunter, L. & Andrew, D. (2002). Watching Wildlife Central America. Lonely Planet. p. 97. ISBN 1-86450-034-4. ^ a b c d Jack, K. (2007). "The Cebines". In Campbell, C.; Fuentes, A.; MacKinnon, Okay.; Panger, M.; Bearder, S. (eds.). Primates in Perspective. The Oxford University Press. pp. 107–120. ISBN 978-0-19-517133-4. ^ Emmons, L. (1997). Neotropical Rainforest Mammals A Field Guide (Second ed.). The University of Chicago Press. pp. 126–127. ISBN 0-226-20721-8. ^ a b Wong, G.; Cuarón, A.D.; Rodriguez-Luna, E. & de Grammont, P.C. (2008). "Saimiri oerstedii". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2008: e.T19836A9022609. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T19836A9022609.en. Retrieved 27 December 2017. ^ Hunter, L. & Andrew, D. (2002). Watching Wildlife Central America. Lonely Planet. p. 148. ISBN 1-86450-034-4. ^ a b Reid, F. (1998). A Field Guide to the Mammals of Central America and Southeast Mexico. Oxford University Press, Inc. pp. 177–180. ISBN 0-19-506401-1. ^ a b c Causado, J.; Cuarón, A.D.; Shedden, A.; Rodríguez-Luna, E. & de Grammont, P.C. (2008). "Cebus capucinus". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2008. Retrieved 2 November 2009.old-form url ^ a b c Cuarón, A.D.; Shedden, A.; Rodríguez-Luna, E.; de Grammont, P.C.; Link, A.; Palacios, E.; Morales, A. & Cortés-Ortiz, L. (2008). "Alouatta palliata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2008: e.T39960A10280447. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T39960A10280447.en. Retrieved 27 December 2017. ^ a b c d Di Fiore, A. & Campbell, C. (2007). "The Atelines". In Campbell, C.; Fuentes, A.; MacKinnon, Ok.; Panger, M. & Bearder, S. (eds.). Primates in Perspective. The Oxford University Press. pp. 155–177. ISBN 978-0-19-517133-4. ^ a b c Cuarón, A.D.; Morales, A.; Shedden, A.; Rodriguez-Luna, E.; de Grammont, P.C. & Cortés-Ortiz, L. (2008). "Ateles geoffroyi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2008: e.T2279A9387270. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T2279A9387270.en. Retrieved 27 December 2017. ^ Hunter, L. & Andrew, D. (2002). Watching Wildlife in Central America. Lonely Planet. p. 151. ISBN 1-86450-034-4. ^ Hunter, L. & Andrew, D. (2002). Watching Wildlife Central America. Lonely Planet. p. 149. ISBN 1-86450-034-4. ^ Ford, S. (2006). "The Biogeographic History of Mesoamerican Preimates". In Estrada, A.; Garber, P.; Pavelka, M.; Luecke, L. (eds.). New Perspectives within the Study of Mesoamerican Primates. Springer. pp. 81–107. ISBN 0-387-25854-X. ^ a b Rylands, A.; Groves, C.; Mittermeier, R.; Cortes-Ortiz, L. & Hines, J. (2006). "Taxonomy and Distributions of Mesoamerican Primates". In Estrada, A.; Garber, P.; Pavelka, M. & Luecke, L. (eds.). New Perspectives in the Study of Mesoamerican Primates. Springer. pp. 32–37. ISBN 0-387-25854-X. ^ a b c Rylands, A.; Groves, C.; Mittermeier, R.; Cortes-Ortiz, L. & Hines, J. (2006). "Taxonomy and Distributions of Mesoamerican Primates". In Estrada, A.; Garber, P.; Pavelka, M. & Luecke, L. (eds.). New Perspectives in the Study of Mesoamerican Primates. Springer. pp. 43–47. ISBN 0-387-25854-X. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (third ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 138–139. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 137. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (third ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 149. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. ^ Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. (eds.). Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 150–151. ISBN 0-801-88221-4. OCLC 62265494. vteCosta Rican monkey species Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii) Geoffroy's spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) Mantled howler (Alouatta palliata) Panamanian white-faced capuchin (Cebus imitator)

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