Lady Catherine Gordon

Lady Catherine used to be born in Scotland, the daughter of George Gordon, 2nd Earl of Huntly, through his 3rd wife, Lady Elizabeth Hay. Some 19th-century writers had assumed she used to be a daughter of Princess...In January 1496, Perkin used to be married to a Lady Catherine Gordon. The Gordons have been a very important circle of relatives; Catherine was once a cousin to James IV, her father George Gordon was the second earl of...Lady Catherine Gordon (c. 1474-October 1537) was once a Scottish noblewoman and the wife of Yorkist pretender Perkin Warbeck, who claimed he used to be Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York. After her imprisonment by way of King Henry VII of England, she changed into a favoured lady-in-waiting of his wife...Lady Catherine Gordon was born on 20 October 1718 at Haddo, Aberdeenshire, ScotlandG.2 She Lord George Gordon was once born on 26 December 1751.1 He used to be the son of Cosmo George Gordon...Lady Catherine Gordon ( 1474-October 1537) was once a Scottish noblewoman and the spouse of Yorkist pretender, Perkin Warbeck. After her imprisonment by way of King Henry VII of England, she turned into a...

Catherine Gordon and Perkin Warbeck - The History of England

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Catherine Gordon and Perkin Warbeck - The History of England

Lady Catherine Gordon - Wikipedia

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Lady Catherine Gordon

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Catherine GordonBornc. 1474DiedOctober 1537BuriedChurch of St. Nicholas, FyfieldNoble familyClan GordonSpouse(s)Perkin Warbeck James StrangewaysMatthew CraddockChristopher AshtonFatherGeorge Gordon, 2d Earl of HuntlyMomElizabeth Hay

Lady Catherine Gordon (c. 1474–October 1537) used to be a Scottish noblewoman and the wife of Yorkist pretender Perkin Warbeck, who claimed he was Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York. After her imprisonment by way of King Henry VII of England, she became a favoured lady-in-waiting of his spouse, Elizabeth of York. She had a complete of four husbands, but there are not any records she had any surviving youngsters.

Family

Lady Catherine was once born in Scotland, the daughter of George Gordon, second Earl of Huntly, by his third wife, Lady Elizabeth Hay.[1] Some Nineteenth-century writers had assumed she used to be a daughter of King James I's daughter Annabella, who were the Earl of Huntly's first spouse.[a][2]

Perkin Warbeck Lady Catherine "Duchess of York" used to be captured at St. Michael's Mount at the Cornish coast in 1497

Before 4 March 1497, Lady Catherine was given in marriage to the pretender Perkin Warbeck, who was liked via King James IV of Scotland for political reasons, and who had it appears been relationship her since 1495, as a love letter[b] from him to the very stunning[c] Lady Catherine has been preserved in the Spanish State Letters, vol, i, p. 78.[3] James IV gave Perkin Warbeck a 'spousing goune' of white damask for the wedding at Edinburgh, and the celebrations integrated a event. Warbeck wore armor covered with purple brocade.[4]

Lady Catherine, now called the Duchess of York, sailed from Ayr with Perkin with Guy Foulcart in the Cuckoo wearing a brand new tanny coloured "sea gown".[5] She was taken prisoner at St. Michael's Mount after King Henry's forces captured Warbeck's Cornish military at Exeter in 1497.[6] On 15 October 1497 there is record of a cost of £7 13s. 4d. to Robert Southwell for horses, saddles and different must haves for the transportation of "my Lady Kateryn Huntleye."[6] Her husband was hanged at Tyburn on 23 November 1499.[7] Lady Catherine was saved a digital prisoner via King Henry who placed her in the family of his spouse, Elizabeth of York, where she was a favourite lady-in-waiting.[8]

Life as Warbeck's Widow

Henry VII paid a few of her expenses from his privy handbag and gave her items of clothing. In the privy handbag accounts her title was recorded as "Lady Kateryn Huntleye".[9][10] These integrated, in November 1501, garments of cloth-of-gold furred with ermine, a purple velvet gown, and a black hood within the French style; in April 1502, black and red velvet for gown and black kersey for stockings; and in November 1502, black satin, and other black cloth, to be trimmed with mink (from her personal inventory) and miniver, with a crimson bonnet.[11] On 25 January 1503 Catherine attended the rite of marriage between James IV and Margaret Tudor at Richmond Palace. James was once represented by the Earl of Bothwell as his proxy.[12]

In February 1503, Lady Catherine was a mourner at the funeral of Queen Elizabeth, arriving in a "chair", a carriage, with Lady Fitzwalter and Lady Mountjoy. The educate of her dress used to be carried by means of the Queen's better half's mother, the Countess of Derby. Lady Catherine made the choices on the masses and with 37 other girls positioned a "pall", an embroidered cloth, on the coffin at Westminster Abbey.[13]

After 1512, Lady Catherine lived at Fyfield Manor, Oxfordshire

In 1510, Lady Catherine got letters of denization and that same year, on 8 August, was given a grant of the manors of Philberts at Bray, and Eaton at Appleton, each then in Berkshire.[14] Two years later she acquired along side her husband the manor of 'Fiffhede', Fyfield, and upon surrender of patent of 8 August the 3 manors had been all re-granted to Lady Catherine Gordon with the proviso she may now not leave England, for Scotland or different international lands, without license.[14]

Subsequent marriages and Death St Nicholas, Fyfield, is thought to be the resting place of Lady Catherine and her 4th husband, Christopher Ashton

Before 13 February 1512, she married James Strangeways of Fyfield, a gentleman usher of the King's Chamber.[1] The couple endowed a chantry priest to sing for the souls of their parents at St Mary Overie at Southwark in London,[15] where James Strangeways, James's father was once buried.

In 1517, she married her third husband, Matthew Craddock of Swansea, Steward of Gower and Seneschal of Kenfig, who died c. July 1531.[1] Matthew Craddock's will notes the jewels and silver that Lady Catherine owned ahead of they had been married. These incorporated a girdle with a pomander, a center of gold, a fleur-de-lis of diamonds, and a gold go with 9 diamonds. He bequeathed her an source of revenue from the lands of Dinas Powys and Llanedeyrn near Cardiff.[16]

Her fourth and last husband was Christopher Ashton of Fyfield additionally then in Berkshire.[17] She is not recorded as having any surviving youngsters; on the other hand, she had two stepchildren through Ashton's earlier marriage.

According to biographer David Loades, Lady Catherine was head of Mary Tudor's Privy Chamber until 1530. When no longer at Court, Catherine resided at Fyfield Manor,[10] excluding throughout her marriage to Craddock when she gained permission to live in Wales.[18] Catherine made her will on 12 October 1537, and died soon after.[19]

Catherine used to be buried in the church of St Nicholas at Fyfield, with a monument, including brass figures (now lost).[10] Matthew Craddock had previously erected a chest monument for himself and "Mi Ladi Katerin" with their effigies in St Mary's Church, Swansea. The carved heraldry integrated trademarks of the Gordon and Hay circle of relatives. Both Catherine's mom and paternal grandmother have been members of the Hay family.[20]

Notes

^ Her mom used to be it sounds as if now not Annabella as some accounts have mentioned, the Earl of Huntly divorced Annabella in 1471. Catherine's effigy in Swansea church has the Gordon and Hay (not Stewart) arms impaled with the ones of Craddock indicating she used to be a daughter of Elizabeth Hay, more than likely her eldest. Catherine was given in marriage by means of King James IV as his cousin, which she can be either as a daughter of Annabella Stewart by means of consanguinity or as a daughter of Elizabeth Hay via affinity. So being called a cousin of the Scottish king did not require she essentially be Annabella's daughter. J. E. Cussans, 'Notes at the Perkin Warbeck Insurrection', in, Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, vol. 1 (1872), p. 63: The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. James Balfour Paul, Vol. IV Edinburgh: David Douglas, (1907), pp. 530-1: Records of Aboyne (1894), 411 ^ The preserved letter to Lady Catherine could also be an instance of the way of this early period:— .mw-parser-output .templatequoteoverflow:hidden;margin:1em 0;padding:0 40px.mw-parser-output .templatequote .templatequoteciteline-height:1.5em;text-align:left;padding-left:1.6em;margin-top:0 Most noble lady, it's not without reason that each one flip their eyes to you; that all recognize love and obey you. For they see your two-fold virtues in which you are such a lot outstanding above all different mortals. Whilst at the one hand, they recognize your riches and immutable prosperity, which secure to you the the Aristocracy of your lineage and the loftiness of your rank, they are, then again, struck by means of your moderately divine than human beauty, and believe that you're not born in our days however descended from Heaven. All look at your face so vivid and serene that it provides splendour to the cloudy sky; all take a look at your eyes so brilliant as stars which make all pain to be forgotten, and turn despair into pleasure; all have a look at your neck which outshines pearls; all have a look at your superb brow. Your purple gentle of sweet sixteen, your fair hair; in one word on the ideally suited perfection of your person:—and taking a look at they can not select however appreciate you; admiring they can not make a choice but to like you; loving they can not make a choice however to obey you. I shall, possibly, be the happiest of your whole admirers, and the happiest guy on earth, since I have reason why to hope you will think me worthy of your love. If I represent to my mind all of your perfections, I'm really not handiest pressured to like, to adore, and to worship you, however love makes me your slave. Whether I was waking or drowsing I can't in finding rest or happiness except for on your affection. All my hopes rest in you, and in you by myself. Most noble lady, my soul, look mercifully down upon me, your slave; who has ever been dedicated to you from the first hour he saw you. Love is not a secular factor, it's heaven born. Do not suppose it beneath your self to obey love's dictates. Not best kings, but in addition gods and goddesses have bent their necks underneath its yoke. I beseech you most noble lady to just accept for ever one who in all things will cheerfully do your will as long as his days shall last. Farewell, my soul and comfort. You, the brightest ornament in Scotland, farewell, farewell. See: Records of Aboyne (1894), 409-10. ^ The lady was once reported to be "singularly beautiful" and that Henry VII "much marveled at her beauty and amiable countenance, and sent her to London to the Queen". Records of Aboyne (1894), 409-10 & 410 n. *.

References

^ a b c The Scots Peerage, Founded on Wood's Edition of Sir Robert Douglas's Peerage of Scotland, ed. James Balfour Paul, Vol. IV (Edinburgh: David Douglas, 1907), pp. 530-1 ^ David Dunlop, 'The 'Masked Comedian': Perkin Warbeck's Adventures in Scotland and England from 1495 to 1497', The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 70, No. 190 (Oct., 1991). p. 100, n. 2 ^ The data of Aboyne MCCXXX-MDCLXXXI, ed. Charles Gordon Huntly (Aberdeen: The New Spalding Club, 1894), pp. 409-10 ^ Norman MacDougall, James IV (Tuckwell: East Linton, 1997), pp. 122-123; Thomas Dickson, Accounts of the Treasurer of Scotland: 1473-1498 (Edinburgh, 1877), pp. 257, 262-4. ^ Thomas Dickson, Accounts of the Treasurer, vol. 1 (Edinburgh, 1877), pp. cliii, 342-5. ^ a b The records of Aboyne MCCXXX-MDCLXXXI, ed. Charles Gordon Huntly (Aberdeen: The New Spalding Club, 1894), p. 410 ^ Rosemary O'Day, The Routledge Companion to the Tudor Age (New York; Oxford: Routledge, 2010), p. 1590. ^ John A. Wagner, Encyclopedia of the Wars of the Roses (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2001), p. 291 ^ Samuel Bentley, Excerpta Historica or Illustrations of English History (London, 1833), p. 115. ^ a b c .mw-parser-output cite.quotationfont-style:inherit.mw-parser-output .quotation qquotes:"\"""\"""'""'".mw-parser-output .id-lock-free a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,clear),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/65/Lock-green.svg")right 0.1em heart/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .id-lock-registration a,.mw-parser-output .quotation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg")correct 0.1em heart/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .id-lock-subscription a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,transparent),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg")correct 0.1em heart/9px no-repeat.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registrationcolor:#555.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration spanborder-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:assist.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon abackground:linear-gradient(transparent,clear),url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg")correct 0.1em heart/12px no-repeat.mw-parser-output code.cs1-codecolour:inherit;background:inherit;border:none;padding:inherit.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-errorshow:none;font-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-errorfont-size:100%.mw-parser-output .cs1-maintdisplay:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em.mw-parser-output .cs1-formatfont-size:95%.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-leftpadding-left:0.2em.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-rightpadding-right:0.2em.mw-parser-output .citation .mw-selflinkfont-weight:inheritLee, Sidney, ed. (1899). "Warbeck, Perkin" . Dictionary of National Biography. 59. London: Smith, Elder & Co. ^ Joseph Bain, Calendar of Documents in relation to Scotland, 1357-1509, vol. 4 (Edinburgh, 1888), nos. 1677, 1685, 1688, (and in Latin, pp. 419-421, no. 36) ^ Thomas Hearne, John Leland, De Rebus Britannicis Collectanea, John Leland, vol. 4 (London, 1774), p. 260. ^ Francis Grose, Antiquarian Repertory, Vol. 4 (London: 1784), pp. 245, 248, 249 ^ a b The records of Aboyne MCCXXX-MDCLXXXI, ed. Charles Gordon Huntly (Aberdeen: The New Spalding Club, 1894), p. 401 ^ John Montgomery Traherne, Historical Notices of Matthew Craddock of Swansea (London, William Rees; Longman and Co.; Cardiff, W. Bird; and Swansea, J. Williams, 1840), p. 25 ^ John Montgomery Traherne, Historical Notices of Matthew Craddock of Swansea (London, William Rees; Longman and Co.; Cardiff, W. Bird; and Swansea, J. Williams, 1840), pp. 6, 8, 16-17 ^ The records of Aboyne MCCXXX-MDCLXXXI, ed. Charles Gordon Huntly (Aberdeen: The New Spalding Club, 1894), p. 413 ^ J. S. Brewer, Letters and Papers Henry VIII, 2:2 (London, 1864), p. 1116 no. 3512. ^ John Montgomery Traherne, Historical Notices of Matthew Craddock of Swansea (London, William Rees; Longman and Co.; Cardiff, W. Bird; and Swansea, J. Williams, 1840), pp. 24-25 ^ Picture of the Craddock tomb, 1941, WW2 Today: John Montgomery Traherne, Historical Notices of Matthew Craddock of Swansea (London, William Rees; Longman and Co.; Cardiff, W. Bird; and Swansea, J. Williams, 1840), pp. 9-12 Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lady_Catherine_Gordon&oldid=1005034035"

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